Interview for EL PAÍS Newspaper

We may not be close to find a permenant solution to the Cyprus problem yet. However we need to learn to cooperate together in order to provide a sustainable future to our children. No matter what, we will keep on sharing our common vision for an integrated, peaceful and ecological city and a better life for all! Thanks to María Hervás from the Spanish leading newspaper EL PAÍS for making us part of their review on Cyprus.

Cyprus: The Trapped Treasures of a Divided Island

»Source: Euronews

euronews“Good morning everybody, welcome to this amazing walking and talking tour of the wonderful city of Famagusta,” says archaeologist and art historian guide Anna Marangou. As always, she and her fellow guide Orhan have words in Greek and Turkish to welcome their party.

Their bi-communal efforts was one of the examples recognized by the Stelios Foundation bi-communal initiative rewards.

Anna is Greek Cypriot, and co-guide Orhan is Turkish Cypriot. Together they take their fellow islanders around discovering Cyprus’s rich cultural heritage. The island has been divided since 1974, with Greek Cypriots in the south and Turkish Cypriots in the north.

Today they are taking a group of Greek Cypriots around the medieval city of Famagusta, in the north. It was once Cyprus’s biggest port, and a shared past is everywhere.

“We shared this cultural heritage from the very ancient times until today. We can live together and we have proved it, because the Greek and Turkish Cypriots have been working together,” says Anna.

Common prosperity is one of the driving hopes of those who strive for reunification.
Many sectors could benefit, not the least tourism.
But it is not what motivates Anna and Orhan the most.

“We are doing it, not for benefits, not to earn money, but to earn our future, and to make a good country for our future for our children and grand-children,” says Orhan Tolun.

The visit ends at one of the conflict’s most symbolic sites, Varosha, the former beachside district of Famagusta.

Under the watchful eye of the Turkish army the area has been abandoned since its Greek Cypriot inhabitants fled over 40 years ago.

“Filming is not allowed in the ghost town of Varosha, the symbol of divided Cyprus,” reports euronews’ Valerie Gauriat. “But if reunification took place, it could become a symbol of a new golden age for the island.”

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Andreas and Ceren want to believe that.
He is Greek Cypriot, she is Turkish Cypriot. Both are architects, and are part of an ambitious reconstruction project. They imagine Famagusta as an eco-city, a possible model for sustainable development and also the flagship of reunification.

“It can become a hub of civilisations and commerce, with a Levantine coastline across. It can aim to sustain the existing buildings, preserving memories, and at the same time benefit from 21st century infrastructure and practices regarding ecological performance,” says Andreas Lordos.

For his Turkish Cypriot colleague, the project could be a model of reconciliation.

“I think this project is giving voice to many trapped souls. And we’re trying to pull them from behind this unreal curtain.These people once lived in here, and they want to live again. And half of their soul is there. And half of our soul is also empty. Because we cannot get integrated,” she says.

The Cypriot business world also strive for an integration which could boost the economy as a whole.
The president of the Turkish Cypriot Chamber of Commerce north of Nicosia, believes a political solution would produce a great leap forward .

“The Turkish Cypriot community will be freed of sanctions. And we will be able to benefit from the entire Cypriot market. Not to mention other European markets.

The geopolitics in the eastern Mediterranean will benefit hugely, because it will enhance regional cooperation. The Greek Cypriot community will immediately enjoy the economic benefits of being able to trade with Turkey,” says Fikri Toros.

Meanwhile, “You still need to go through checkpoints to get from one side of the island to the other. Trade is limited by the so-called green line regulations and, in the absence of a political solution, represents less than 10% of the potential commerce,” says Valérie Gauriat.

Some companies have been able to maintain an enduring cross-border dialogue, and are merely waiting for the restrictions to be lifted says the president of the Cypriot Republic’s Chamber of Commerce in southern Nicosia.
So are foreign investors.

“The business communities are already talking to each other, about possible partnerships, joint ventures, or cooperation. Talking to investors, I believe that there will be a renewed interest for large projects. Let’s not forget that Cyprus is on the route of transporting to Europe natural gas, a lot of which has been discovered in the eastern Mediterranean basin.” says Phidias K. Pilides.

Sharing the vision for an integrated, environmentally and economically sustainable Famagusta

It has never been easy to put 40 years of division into words… It is even harder to picture the socio-psychological, environmental and economic problems occurred by this division. We would like to thank Valerie Gauriat from Euronews and Crewhouse to give us chance to discuss about our vision for an integrated, environmentally and economically sustainable city that could easily be a model for peace in Cyprus. The bicommunal Famagusta Ecocity Project has become an umbrella concept that was embraced by extensive number of  bi-communal work groups for a sustainable and peaceful coexistence in the island.

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The Crewhouse, Andreas Lords, me and  Valerie Gauriat

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Photo by Zoe Lordos

 

Thanks to Al Jazeera to help us to share our vision for an integrated Famagusta

Thanks to Megan and Wojtek from Al Jazeera to help us to share our vision for an integrated Famagusta! All about the project and more is coming in the documentary by Vasia Markides soon.

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The Famagusta Ecocity Project Teaser

Peace making, Freedom, Equality and The Famagusta Ecocity Project

European Parliament definitely needs such brave and ambitious people! I had an amazing day with Berta Herrero talking about the current situation in the island and arround, peace making, freedom, equality, diversity, democracy and of course The Famagusta Ecocity Project. The Meditteranean spirit bounds people beyond the countries; it must be the sea…

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